Close
Popular
Architecture (70)Conservation (28)Community (23)design (23)Landscape (20)Heritage (19)Teaching (17)Social (17)Interior (16)Historic (15)
Menu
ScottishPower House

ScottishPower House

Key Facts

Client

ScottishPower Ltd

Location

330-336 St Vincent St, Glasgow

Value

£75 million

Internal Floor Area

35,000m2

Completion

September 2017

A fitting new home for a company that has been a huge asset for Glasgow - Nicola Sturgeon, First Minister.

Project Info

The new, impressive St. Vincent Street headquarters, is the largest single-use office to be built in Glasgow for 25 years. The fourteen-storey building, occupies the site to its capacity providing the most efficient plan form possible whilst maximising the potential for future flexibility. A simple diagram of two linear east/west office blocks of different floor plate heights was devised, with a top lit glazed atrium access and service cores arranged between them.

The building provides:
• A pleasant, secure and modern working environment for staff.
• Social facilities: 280-capacity Lecture Theatre, meeting areas, staff restaurant, gym, occupational health suite and welfare facilities as well as underground car park spaces.
• High quality external and internal materials, in line with Iberdrola’s corporate guidelines.
• Ability to respond to improving technology, communication and IT capabilities.
• Incorporation of a Tier III data centre to host centralised IT functions.
• Inclusion of an Alarm Receiving Centre for the wider ScottishPower estate

In an urban context, the building filled a formerly derelict site, improving the perception of the city from the motorway. Now a prominent feature of Glasgow’s skyscape, the building is easily recognisable. For pedestrians, the generous arcade that surrounds the building has created a safe, protected walkway: providing shelter from the inclement Scottish elements. This also creates additional area, maximising the floor area at the upper floors. This meant that, unusually, main floors created an overhang over the public road to the north, whilst the basement extended beneath it.

Creative Workspace
Cross Section
Cross Section

Economic and Social Incentives

The strive for energy efficiency started at the outset of the design phase when it was decided to opt for a concrete building rather than the traditional steel frame. This thermal mass provides the ability to absorb heat and then release it when the office temperature drops. The next challenge was the 80m long by 14 storey south facing elevation. Although partially shaded by adjacent buildings the environmental analysis showed that an all-glass façade would require significant additional cooling. The design concept of external ventilation risers, in conjunction with the concrete structure, created a rhythm of glass / concrete (riser) / glass / concrete (frame) to provide an element of solidity to the southern elevation, creating a quality office environment but maintaining good external views. The choice of a high-performance glazing system, beyond current day standards, further reduced the solar gain. Air permeability was targeted in compliance with the BCO. Therefore, as with all good designs the ability to reduce energy consumption was focused on the building form even before consideration of the internal building services design.

The services were designed to achieve sub division for future tenancy flexibility but the philosophy maintained the strive for low energy consumption. The ventilation is arranged in multiple vertical slices while the heat and cooling is provided by air source heat pumps (VRF) operating on a floor by (sub) floor arrangement. The VRF system incorporates a hydro box solution which takes waste heat from the offices and uses it to pre-heat domestic hot water. As the office areas are predominantly in cooling mode this provides significant energy savings.  The ventilation system incorporates heat recovery.

Energy efficient systems are one thing but control is critical to effective operation. The BMS incorporates full building control, not just of the mechanical systems but also delivers the lighting control in a single integrated system.

The building includes rainwater harvesting to minimise water use.

Long Section
Long Section

Sustainability

The ability to reduce energy consumption was focused on the building form even before consideration of the internal building services design. This started at the outset of the design phase when it was decided to opt for a concrete building. Its thermal mass provides the ability to absorb heat and then release it when the office temperature drops.

The environmental analysis of the 80m long by 14 storey south facing elevation, showed that an all-glass façade would require significant additional cooling. The design concept of external ventilation risers, in conjunction with the concrete structure, created a rhythm of glass / concrete (riser) / glass / concrete (frame) to provide an element of solidity to the southern elevation, creating a quality office environment but maintaining good external views. The choice of a high-performance glazing system, beyond standards, further reduced the solar gain. Air permeability was targeted in compliance with the BCO.

Services were designed to achieve sub division for future tenancy flexibility whilst striving for low energy consumption. Ventilation is arranged in multiple vertical slices while the heat and cooling is provided by air source heat pumps (VRF) operating on a floor by (sub)floor arrangement. The system incorporates a hydrobox solution which takes waste heat from the offices and uses it to pre-heat domestic hot water. As the office areas are predominantly in cooling mode this provides significant energy savings.

Briefing & Interiors

Brief

Extensive engagement with the staff was required and the phased relocation was carried out without any issues. Users have settled in well and remark on the quality of space and ease of use of the building and its facilities.

The key objectives for the building were:

• A high-quality environment appropriate to one of Scotland’s largest and most successful companies reflecting the ethos of both ScottishPower and Iberdrola
• Flexible accommodation, able to meet changing internal reorganisation as well as partial subletting.
• Catalyst for change of working practices, whilst maintaining the Regulator’s strict requirements.
• Best value for money based of whole life cycle cost
• Suitable environment, with a BREEAM rate of excellent and a minimum EPC of C.

Health and Wellbeing

The wellbeing of the staff was present from the development of the brief for the building and included a restaurant, and more importantly an occupational health suit and gym.

The restaurant and the gym are prominent within the ground floor and first floor levels, with the gym visible from the staff entrance and the street beyond. The full gym provides changing and showering areas, a cardio and resistance room and a dedicated studio for classes developed around the staff needs.

Gym
Gym

Internal Spaces

The working offices are located from level 1 to level 12 . The typical floor plan is organised by several parameters:

Modularity

The layout follows the ceiling grid module and enclosed spaces are multiples of this grid and repetitive units, making interchange of spaces easy.

Noise control

Reducing the noise transmission between enclosed areas was paramount.

Variety of worksettings

The modular spaces create a number of individual workspaces, collaborative areas and support spaces that provide each the floors with a wide choice. Within the open area, a series of informal meeting areas in a variety of sizes break up the rhythm of workstations.

Maximizing daylight and views out

All enclosed spaces are located on the atrium facade of the floor plate. This allows light to come in from the exterior and allows the population of the floor to look out into the long views of the city, avoiding privatising the views and offering a better perspective to the entire floorplate

Proximity to services

Wet areas are located close to the building cores to facilitate connections to M&E services

The layout maintains two thirds of the floor plate as open area.  The area of enclosed spaces is organised following practical grounds. Spaces which are not continuously occupied can be located in areas with borrowed light, like meeting rooms, storage areas, quiet points and tea preps, forming the inner band in the plan. A circulation area separates this area from the open plan zone. The open area is articulated in two bands containing two workstations separated by a secondary corridor. The east west distribution of these relates to the building module. The outer band includes workstations whereas the central band incorporates copy print points, banks of storage as well as informal meeting spaces.

The finishes to the workplates have been determined by Iberdrola’s corporate guidelines. With high quality finishes in a combination of white painted walls, double-glazed acoustic frameless partitions timber panelling, magnetic glass panelling and carpet finish to raised access floors.

Selected Awards

RICS Award 2018 - Commercial Category

BCO 2018 - Shortlist, Commercial Category

Consultants

Project Manager: GVA Second London Wall
Structural Engineer: Arup
M&E Engineer: TUV SUD
Cost Consultant: Turner & Townsend
Contractor: Laing O’Rourke
Photographer: Andrew Lee
Developer : Helical Bar Plc
Interior Designer: Page\Park Architects